Category Archives: Seasonal

Winter Sun Safety Tips from the Skin Cancer Foundation

Winter sports enthusiasts are at increased risk for overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The combination of higher altitude and UV rays reflected by the snow puts skiers and snowboarders at an increased risk of sun damage, and ultimately skin cancer. More than 90 percent of all skin cancers are associated with sun exposure.

“It’s easy to associate winter with frostbite and windburn, but most people are unaware that UV rays can be every bit as damaging on the slopes as on the beach,” said Perry Robins, MD, President, The Skin Cancer Foundation. “With the winter sports season ahead of us, it’s more important than ever to take proper precautions on the slopes.”

Higher altitude means increased risk of sun-induced skin damage, since UV radiation exposure increases 4 to 5 percent with every 1,000 feet above sea level. At an altitude of 9,000 to 10,000 feet, UV radiation may be 35 to 45 percent more intense than at sea level. In addition, snow reflects up to 80 percent of the UV light from the sun, meaning that you are often hit by the same rays twice. This only increases the risk for damage.

Both snow and strong wind can wear away sunscreen and reduce its effectiveness, so you have to take extra precautions. To protect your skin from the bitter cold, heavy winds and winter sun, follow these important sun protection tips:

Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF (Sun Protection Factor) of 30 or higher whenever you spend extended time outdoors. Apply 30 minutes before hitting the slopes. Be aware that the sun’s reflection off the snow is strong even on cloudy days. (Up to 80 percent of the sun’s rays can penetrate clouds.)

Apply sunscreen liberally and evenly to all exposed skin – most skiers and snowboarders do not use enough. You should apply at least a teaspoon to the face.

Use a moisturizing sunscreen with ingredients like lanolin or glycerin. Winter conditions can be particularly harsh on the skin.

Be sure to cover often-missed spots: the lips, ears, around the eyes, and on the neck, the underside of chin, scalp and hands.

Reapply every two hours, and immediately after heavy sweating.

Always wear a lip balm with an SPF 15 or higher – lips are very sensitive.

Carry a travel-sized sunscreen and lip balm with you on the slopes. Reapply on the chairlift, especially after a long, snow-blown run.

Read more winter sun safety tips from the Skin Cancer Foundation here.

Protecting Your Skin from Winter’s Bite

It’s November again, which means that across much of America, pleasant summer and autumn weather is being replaced by the cold, dry, windy weather of winter. With that weather comes dry chapped lips and skin caused by low humidity and windy conditions. For outdoor enthusiasts, that typically means chapped lips and dry, chapped fingers and hands. The pain associated with these conditions makes participation in all sports and outdoor activities more difficult.

The primary cause of drier, reddened and cracking skin is the lower humidity, the winter wind and the lower temperatures. These conditions dry out your lips, creating a natural urge to apply moisturizers or lick the lips frequently. Licking your lips results in more cracks and irritation, and more licking — a very vicious cycle. The change in weather also dries the skin on your hands, resulting in cracks around your nails. This can make even the most mundane daily tasks quite painful.

There are several things you can do to prevent chapped, painful lips and hands:

  1. Natural oils on your skin help to hold moisture, whereas showers and harsh soaps act to remove those oils. By taking warm showers and using mild soaps you can help retain some of the natural oils on your skin.
  2. Apply moisturizers to your skin that contain lanolin or petroleum jelly.
  3. Dress to prevent wind and sun exposure that can dry out your skin.
  4. Wear water proof clothing and warm, comfortable, water resistant shoes as well.
  5. Apply moisturizers and sunscreen to prevent wind and sun damage.

For areas of cracked, reddened and painful lips and skin apply products that contain 1% Hydrocortisone. The Hydrocortisone acts by reducing the inflammation associated with chapped lips and dry, scaling skin. It heals the chapped skin and cracked areas on your lips and fingers making the harsh weather more tolerable. It is also effective for fever blisters, chapped skin due to lip licking (especially in children), allergies to lipstick, and effects of chemicals in other lip balms that may cause painful, irritated lips.

Applying lotion that contains 1% Hydrocortisone can also reduce the scaling and dryness associated with winter weather. As an ingredient, it helps to make skin moisturizers more effective by healing the cracked areas on your skin.

When the winter weather makes your skin and lips miserable, reach for Dr. Dan’s Cortibalm, the only lip balm with 1% hydrocortisone and Dr. Dan’s Hand Lotion for softer, more comfortable lips and skin.

True Stories: Mosquito Allergies

This month’s true story comes from Cecilia Henson, who has long suffered from allergic reactions to mosquito bites.

Hi, my name is Cecilia Henson and this message is regarding the Dr. Dan’s Anti-itch Stick and how it has helped me immensely these last few days. I was relaxing in the backyard with my friend, Danny Devries, when I abruptly started to itch my leg and I immediately knew I had been bit by a mosquito. Being allergic to them, I suffer all summer long with tennis ball sized swells on my legs that are consistently itching for days. Normally, I take a Benadryl and rub cortisone cream on the bumps almost hourly while resisting the urge to itch. So, I asked Danny if he had any cortisone that I could use and, surprisingly enough, he gave me the Anti-itch Stick. Never having heard of Dr. Dan’s products before, I was skeptical but very relieved and desperate at the same time. I rubbed the Anti- itch stick on all three mosquito bites and it worked instantly, alleviating both the itch and the swelling. I was in complete disbelief! Nothing has ever worked this well. I will always continue to purchase Dr. Dan’s from now on and recommend it to everyone I know.

Got a true story of your own? We’d love to hear it! Leave it in the comments, or send us an email at info@drdanslipbalm.com.

Work Outdoors? Here are 21 Ways to Protect Against Skin Cancer

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, sun is the primary cause of skin cancer, and that means that those who work outside most of the time are at high risk for this disease. However, the dangers of skin cancer in this industry have often been neglected.

Follow these prevention guidelines for outdoor workers below to stay safe in the sun:

  • Outside jobs can sometimes be done inside or moved to a shady location. A temporary shelter can be erected or trees and buildings used for protection.
  • A shady spot should be available for lunch and coffee breaks.
  • Reorganize the job so tasks requiring outdoor work get done in the morning before 10 am and after 4 pm, to avoid the hours of greatest sun intensity.
  • Wear protective clothing and cover the skin.
  • Long-sleeved, closely-woven shirts and long trousers or skirts provide the best protection.
  • Avoid clothes that you can see light through. If light is getting through, the ultraviolet radiation is getting through as well.
  • If shorts are worn, a pair that approaches the knee will offer more protection than a shorter pair.
  • A collar will protect the skin on the back of the neck.
  • Wear a hat and sunglasses
  • A hat will keep the sun off the face, neck and ears. It will also protect bald spots.
  • Broad-brimmed hats are best. The brim should be at least 3 inches wide.
  • If a lot of bending is required, have a flap on the back of the hat, which will keep the sun off the back of the neck.
  • Hardhats can have a flap or extra brim fitted to them.
  • Use sunglasses or safety glasses that filter out UV rays.
  • Use an SPF 15 or higher sunscreen before going outdoors.
  • Use a water-resistant sunscreen when working with water or when perspiring.
  • Some substances increase the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation. These include industrial chemicals such as asphalt and diphenyls, and some medications. A water-resistant sunscreen will help give protection when there is likely to be skin contact with these substances.
  • Choose a stick lotion form of sunscreen; sprays and gels often contain ingredients related to cancer or others that break down on exposure to the sun. Sprays can also be inhaled into your lungs and cause other problems.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours. If sweating freely, reapply more often.
  • Make sure the face, lips, neck, ears, arms and back of the hands are protected.
  • Ultraviolet radiation bounces off water, sand, concrete, light-colored surfaces and snow. People who work near these areas will need to take extra care.

Thanks to the Skin Cancer Foundation for these great tips!

It’s your day in the sun, don’t let sunburn ruin it!

Check out the Dr. Dan’s difference: we applied Dr. Dan’s NEW SunStick SPF30 to one half of this leg, and a leading competitor’s SPF to the other. Dr. Dan’s kept the skin healthy and protected, while the leading competitor left the skin burnt and blistered.

Try it for yourself, check out Dr. Dan’s NEW SunStick SPF30 at http://www.drdanslipbalm.com/Dr-Dans-Sunstick-SPF30

Protecting Your Skin from the Sun

This week we’d love to share some tips for protecting your skin from the sun from our friends at Basil Magazine. They know that Dr. Dan’s Sunblock SPF30 is the best way to protect your lips, and you can check out their review here.

“It’s summer and there is nothing better than fun in the sun! There are tons of outdoor activities such as baseball games, amusement parks, camping, hiking, BBQ’s and a host of other activities. While you’re having fun this season, make sure that you protect your skin from the sun as the sun’s drying rays can prematurely age the skin and lead to wrinkles. Use your sunscreen!

Everyone needs sunscreen to protect their skin from damaging UV rays from the sun and sunburn. Using sunscreen products decreases the chances for sunburn and can prevent skin cancer or malignant melanoma. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2009, more than 1 million people were expected to be diagnosed with skin cancer and research studies link skin cancer with sun exposure on unprotected skin.

Sunscreens are products combining several ingredients that help prevent the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching the skin. Two types of ultraviolet radiation, UVA and UVB, damage the skin, age it prematurely, and increase your risk of skin cancer.

UVB is the chief culprit behind sunburn, while UVA rays, which penetrate the skin more deeply, are associated with wrinkling, leathering, sagging, and other light-induced effects of aging. They also exacerbate the carcinogenic effects of UVB rays, and increasingly are being seen as a cause of skin cancer on their own. Sunscreens vary in their ability to protect against UVA and UVB.

What Is SPF?

Most sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher do an excellent job of protecting against UVB. SPF — or Sun Protection Factor — is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. Here’s how it works: If it takes 20 minutes for your unprotected skin to start turning red, using an SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer — about five hours.

Another way to look at it is in terms of percentages: SPF 15 filters out approximately 93 percent of all incoming UVB rays. SPF 30 keeps out 97 percent and SPF 50 keeps out 98 percent. They may seem like negligible differences, but if you are light-sensitive, or have a history of skin cancer, those extra percentages will make a difference. And as you can see, no sunscreen can block all UV rays.

But there are problems with the SPF model: First, no sunscreen, regardless of strength, should be expected to stay effective longer than two hours without reapplication. Second, “reddening” of the skin is a reaction to UVB rays alone and tells you little about what UVA damage you may be getting. Plenty of damage can be done without the red flag of sunburn being raised.

Sunburn

Your skin responds to excessive sun exposure by turning red, becoming hot, and slightly painful to the touch. Severe sunburns cause skin blistering and peeling. The sun’s rays have two types of harmful UV rays–UVA and UVB. UVA rays penetrate your skin more deeply than UVB and are the cause of premature skin aging. UVB rays are the primary sun burning agent.

Don’t forget the Children

Children are at particular risk because they forget to reapply as often as needed when they are busy playing. Beach and lake vacations present special challenges for parents to monitor sunscreen coverage on children because water enhances the effect of radiation. According to a recent study discussed in Science Daily, 7-year-old children who vacationed at the beach had a 5 percent increase in skin moles–a major risk factor in malignant melanoma.

For this month, I wanted to include some of my picks for protecting yourself from the sun. So, if you don’t use anything to protect yourself from the sun, consider these options below. Also, if you already use sunscreens, here are a few more to try as they are all natural products. I’ve also included a few lip balms. Whatever you do, be sure to use something!

Thanks,

Illani, Your Green Beauty Girl”

True Story: Bugged No More in Florida

This week’s story comes from Florida, where summertime means heat, humidity, and bugs. Thankfully, our new Advanced Anti-Itch Stick is just with the doctor ordered!

Living in Florida we have tons of insects and issues with bug bites. From mosquitos, sand fleas, fire ants, and even the occasional random spider bite we get a few bug bites! Your new Anti-itch Stick has been put through the test in my family. We have tried it on every type of insect bite you can think of – it relieves the swelling within hours and takes away the itch and irritation almost immediately.

The most amazing part is that after being bit by what we think was a spider, my Mom’s calf had an area the size of a soft ball that was swollen and red. We applied the anti-itch to the affected area and within three hours the swelling had gone down and the red was only about the size of a quarter. After one more application the bite was the size of a pencil eraser. Very effective product – We love this product and can’t wait to try the others and hope to see more products to come from you all. We have confidence every product you make will be very effective and affordable.

Being bugged no more – Florida